VOLKSBÜHNE
Berlin


 

School of Disobedience:
Climate Change – A History #1
04.03.

Seminar
English

With Wilko von Hardenberg

Weather and climate influence our lives at many levels, ranging from daily life to apocalyptic visions of the future. In recent years, debates about the role of human agency in climate change have become central in public debate. The role of humans as a force of global climate change has even led to reflect about the need for a new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. This seminar explores the history of ideas, policies, and practices behind modern conceptions of climate as a global system. Our aim is to put current debates on climate change into historical and critical perspective as we seek to understand the varying ways climate has been interpreted and understood over time.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Wilko von Hardenberg is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by February 22nd to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg is senior research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin where he coordinates the research cluster “Art of Judgement” and works on a history of the concept of mean sea level. Trained as a political historian and a geographer in Turin and Cambridge his researches have been mainly aimed at disentangling different aspects of 20th century environmental history. Prior to moving to Berlin he worked at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Rachel Carson Center and the Deutsches Museum in Munich, the University of Trento, and the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa.

Photo: Patsy Lynch/FEMA
Seaside Heights after Hurricane Sandy (New Jersey, Nov 2012)


School of Disobedience
The School of Disobedience is an experimental format to test new ways of independent knowledge production in the 21st century. The inspiration is the spirit of Berlin, the city as an image for this time and this world, heterogeneous, international and politicized. The goal of the School of Disobedience is to concentrate this potential of the city and put it to use for working on a common future. The combination of humanistic and technological perspectives should help to support specific projects which are based on a progressive view of society and will further our sense of justice.

Launched in fall 2018 and continuing into 2019, the School of Disobedience will work in the Grünen Salon with a set of events to test formats and content of the para-academic practice. There will be seminars open for anybody interested in the connection of academic and activist thinking and working, a lab for technologists and theoreticians, a makerspace for people with experiences in different areas, from law to coding, from NGO to academia. Each month, a different academic expert leads a seminar on his or her research and invites people of all ages, professions and experience to join as its students. There will also be monthly public evening events in the evenings, which will allow the general audience an insight into that month’s issue in focus.

The School of Disobedience is realized in cooperation with Nemetschek Foundation.

Past Activities

School of Disobedience: Artificial Intelligence for the Common Good #1

With Lorena Jaume-Palasí

Algorithms are the smallest unit constituting what we call “artificial intelligence” (AI). They area at the core of the current public debate on the ethical and social impact of AI. The commercialization of AI based services and products such as smartphones, insurance services, search engines, online shopping and social media are raising concerns and uncertainty over its consequences for human beings.

The manifestation of this technology into services and products is leading to a scrutinization and evaluation of the technology from a very individualistic human or consumer rights perspective. However, the products and services derived from AI are not equal to the nature of AI. AI and algorithmic systems do not understand individuals. They are a technology standardizing and automating processes where humans are being categorized into fine granular collectives. This is technically creating an immaterial infrastructure through software in sectors where this infrastructural dimension was unthinkable. Infrastructure is the architectonical expression of the politics of a society. It facilitates and distributes power, creates the conditions for societal inclusion or exclusion and shapes the common public space.

AI is a technology impacting societies architectonically and thus on a collective level.

The current conversation around the ethics and laws to harness AI is focused on preserving democratic values with individual instruments. This reactive approach is not a strategy and will not work for collective problems. Resistance and contestation imply action instead of reaction. Action implies contesting by presenting alternatives. This workshop will focus on analyzing technology mediated power structures to develop societal fictions, imaginaries and visions focused on the common good and public interest with the use of AI.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Lorena Jaume-Palasí is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by May 13th to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Lorena Jaume-Palasí is founder of The Ethical Tech Society, a non-profit focused on the social impact of technology. Her work centers on ethics and legal philosophy. Since 2017 in the Advisory Council of AI of the Spanish government. 2018 Theodor Heuss Medal " for their contribution to a differentiated consideration of algorithms and their mechanisms of action" with the AlgorithmWatch initiative.

Image: Supertree Grove, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. Source: Wikimedia Commons

School of Disobedience: Artificial Intelligence for the Common Good

Lorena Jaume-Palasí in conversation with Payal Arora

Currently, artificial intelligence delivers lots of material for projections about the future of societies. It seems to disrupt our concept of space, time and borders. Predominant is the view that AI will become or even is already a tool to create dystopias of oppression. However, this is only the view of a few, albeit famous, scholars and intellectuals.

But what about those who are supposed to be oppressed? Do they play an active role in the conversation? How is their perception of artificial intelligence and datafication? And what are their visions? Payal Arora will be offering answers from her research in China, India and Brazil and present her new book The Next Billion Users. Join Payal Arora and Lorena Jaume-Palasí for a conversation about utopias, AI and the missing link between AI critics and the common good

Lorena Jaume-Palasí is founder of The Ethical Tech Society, a non-profit focused on the social impact of technology. Her work centers on ethics and legal philosophy. Since 2017 in the Advisory Council of AI of the Spanish government. 2018 Theodor Heuss Medal " for their contribution to a differentiated consideration of algorithms and their mechanisms of action" with the AlgorithmWatch initiative.

Dr. Payal Arora is Associate Professor at the Department of Media and Communication of Erasmus University Rotterdam. She is also the Founder and Executive Director of Catalyst Lab, a center that reignites relations between academia, industry and the public using social media campaigns on social issues of contemporary concern. Her research focus lies in digital cultures and social inequality, new media activism, edutainment and IT for international development.

Image: Supertree Grove, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. Source: Wikimedia Commons

School of Disobedience: Art and the Blockchain – Token Logic Design Sessions #3

With Erik Bordeleau

With the advent of blockchain or distributed ledger technologies, more and more people are experimenting with new logics and protocols of self-organization, embracing and inventing different networked-based, p2p models of governance and value production along the way. Are we moving toward what Lovink and Rossiter have dubbed "organized networks" or "networks with consequences"? What are the different techno-social components defining these emerging distributed autonomous organisations (DAO) and other new organizational forms? How can cryptographically enabled distributed economic-organizational systems - aka economic spaces - allow for the building of radically different modes of collective individuation?

This seminar will adopt a practice-based approach. Each session will introduce and discuss some blockchain-based initiatives oriented toward the creation of crypto-scalable commons. We will explore different ways of experimenting with programmable assemblages of smart contracts, semi-automated governance mechanisms, crypto-economics incentives and protocols for interaction designed to facilitate the fruitful alignment of interests and purposes and establish the basis of durable collaborations. The participants to the seminar will thus familiarize themselves with different challenges and issues regarding token logic design and the building of nomadic, anti-fragile socio-technical infrastructures for the coming economy.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Erik Bordeleau is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by March 28th to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Erik Bordeleau is a fugitive financial planner at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA) and researcher at the SenseLab (Montreal, Concordia University). His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, financial theory, contemporary art and media studies. He is currently working on the creation of an MA program in cryptoeconomics at the Global Center for Advanced Studies (GCAS) and enjoy, from time to time, the discreet charm of the precariat.

School of Disobedience: Art and the Blockchain – Token Logic Design Sessions #2

With Erik Bordeleau

With the advent of blockchain or distributed ledger technologies, more and more people are experimenting with new logics and protocols of self-organization, embracing and inventing different networked-based, p2p models of governance and value production along the way. Are we moving toward what Lovink and Rossiter have dubbed "organized networks" or "networks with consequences"? What are the different techno-social components defining these emerging distributed autonomous organisations (DAO) and other new organizational forms? How can cryptographically enabled distributed economic-organizational systems - aka economic spaces - allow for the building of radically different modes of collective individuation?

This seminar will adopt a practice-based approach. Each session will introduce and discuss some blockchain-based initiatives oriented toward the creation of crypto-scalable commons. We will explore different ways of experimenting with programmable assemblages of smart contracts, semi-automated governance mechanisms, crypto-economics incentives and protocols for interaction designed to facilitate the fruitful alignment of interests and purposes and establish the basis of durable collaborations. The participants to the seminar will thus familiarize themselves with different challenges and issues regarding token logic design and the building of nomadic, anti-fragile socio-technical infrastructures for the coming economy.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Erik Bordeleau is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by March 28th to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Erik Bordeleau is a fugitive financial planner at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA) and researcher at the SenseLab (Montreal, Concordia University). His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, financial theory, contemporary art and media studies. He is currently working on the creation of an MA program in cryptoeconomics at the Global Center for Advanced Studies (GCAS) and enjoy, from time to time, the discreet charm of the precariat.

School of Disobedience: Art and the Blockchain

A lecture performance by The Sphere (initiated by Sara De Vylder, Olle Saloranta Strandberg), followed by a discussion with Erik Bordeleau

The Sphere is a radically innovative p2p community platform for self-organization in the performing arts. In the Sphere, artists and technologists collaborate to program assemblages of smart contracts that distribute funds connected to a performance project. We call these semi-automated programs the Sphere's "digital souls". The goal is to catalyse working opportunities for all the participants and nurture the performing art ecosystem, both materially and artistically. As a collaborative emergent infrastructure, the Sphere is a call to experiment and challenge the traditional frameworks of cultural production. By leveraging the capacity to register each and everyone’s contribution to a given creative process, by setting attractors for our own collective behaviors through the design of fair and stimulating socio-financial incentives, the Sphere fosters a spirit of speculative generosity by making the potential success of one performance a catalyst for the entire community.

Saloranta & de Vylder is a framework for the collaboration between Sara de Vylder and Olle Saloranta Strandberg, both with many years of experience as producer, director and artistic project leader for, among other things, Circus Cirkör and Södra Teatern. Together, they’ve worked with contemporary circus productions touring all over the world, and have created a broad network in Sweden and internationally. They’ve initiated the circus for-purpose enterprise SFÄREN and are currently working with The Sphere – a programmable organization and economic space for the contemporary circus community using blockchain technology. Their collaboration revolves around forms of self-organization, productivity and a fascination for utopias.

Erik Bordeleau is a fugitive financial planner at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA) and researcher at the SenseLab (Montreal, Concordia University). His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, financial theory, contemporary art and media studies. He is currently working on the creation of an MA program in cryptoeconomics at the Global Center for Advanced Studies (GCAS) and enjoy, from time to time, the discreet charm of the precariat.

School of Disobedience: Art and the Blockchain – Token Logic Design Sessions #1

With Erik Bordeleau

With the advent of blockchain or distributed ledger technologies, more and more people are experimenting with new logics and protocols of self-organization, embracing and inventing different networked-based, p2p models of governance and value production along the way. Are we moving toward what Lovink and Rossiter have dubbed "organized networks" or "networks with consequences"? What are the different techno-social components defining these emerging distributed autonomous organisations (DAO) and other new organizational forms? How can cryptographically enabled distributed economic-organizational systems - aka economic spaces - allow for the building of radically different modes of collective individuation?

This seminar will adopt a practice-based approach. Each session will introduce and discuss some blockchain-based initiatives oriented toward the creation of crypto-scalable commons. We will explore different ways of experimenting with programmable assemblages of smart contracts, semi-automated governance mechanisms, crypto-economics incentives and protocols for interaction designed to facilitate the fruitful alignment of interests and purposes and establish the basis of durable collaborations. The participants to the seminar will thus familiarize themselves with different challenges and issues regarding token logic design and the building of nomadic, anti-fragile socio-technical infrastructures for the coming economy.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Erik Bordeleau is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by March 28th to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Erik Bordeleau is a fugitive financial planner at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA) and researcher at the SenseLab (Montreal, Concordia University). His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, financial theory, contemporary art and media studies. He is currently working on the creation of an MA program in cryptoeconomics at the Global Center for Advanced Studies (GCAS) and enjoy, from time to time, the discreet charm of the precariat.

School of Disobedience: Climate Change – A History #3

With Wilko von Hardenberg

Weather and climate influence our lives at many levels, ranging from daily life to apocalyptic visions of the future. In recent years, debates about the role of human agency in climate change have become central in public debate. The role of humans as a force of global climate change has even led to reflect about the need for a new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. This seminar explores the history of ideas, policies, and practices behind modern conceptions of climate as a global system. Our aim is to put current debates on climate change into historical and critical perspective as we seek to understand the varying ways climate has been interpreted and understood over time.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Wilko von Hardenberg is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by February 22nd to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg is senior research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin where he coordinates the research cluster “Art of Judgement” and works on a history of the concept of mean sea level. Trained as a political historian and a geographer in Turin and Cambridge his researches have been mainly aimed at disentangling different aspects of 20th century environmental history. Prior to moving to Berlin he worked at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Rachel Carson Center and the Deutsches Museum in Munich, the University of Trento, and the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa.

Photo: Patsy Lynch/FEMA
Seaside Heights after Hurricane Sandy (New Jersey, Nov 2012)

School of Disobedience: Climate Change – A History

Wilko von Hardenberg in conversation with Mark Lawrence

Weather and climate influence our lives at many levels, ranging from daily life to apocalyptic visions of the future. In recent years, debates about the role of human agency in climate change have become central in public debate. The role of humans as a force of global climate change has even led to reflect about the need for a new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. This seminar explores the history of ideas, policies, and practices behind modern conceptions of climate as a global system. Our aim is to put current debates on climate change into historical and critical perspective as we seek to understand the varying ways climate has been interpreted and understood over time.

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg is senior research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin where he coordinates the research cluster “Art of Judgement” and works on a history of the concept of mean sea level. Trained as a political historian and a geographer in Turin and Cambridge his researches have been mainly aimed at disentangling different aspects of 20th century environmental history. Prior to moving to Berlin he worked at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Rachel Carson Center and the Deutsches Museum in Munich, the University of Trento, and the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa.

Photo: Patsy Lynch/FEMA
Seaside Heights after Hurricane Sandy (New Jersey, Nov 2012)

School of Disobedience: Climate Change – A History #2

With Wilko von Hardenberg

Weather and climate influence our lives at many levels, ranging from daily life to apocalyptic visions of the future. In recent years, debates about the role of human agency in climate change have become central in public debate. The role of humans as a force of global climate change has even led to reflect about the need for a new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. This seminar explores the history of ideas, policies, and practices behind modern conceptions of climate as a global system. Our aim is to put current debates on climate change into historical and critical perspective as we seek to understand the varying ways climate has been interpreted and understood over time.

Registration required. The three-part seminar with Wilko von Hardenberg is open to all interested parties, regardless of age, occupation or level of education. Due to limited capacity, however, we ask that you submit a short letter about you yourself and your interest in the seminar by February 22nd to schoolofdisobedience@protonmail.com. You will then receive additional information directly.

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg is senior research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin where he coordinates the research cluster “Art of Judgement” and works on a history of the concept of mean sea level. Trained as a political historian and a geographer in Turin and Cambridge his researches have been mainly aimed at disentangling different aspects of 20th century environmental history. Prior to moving to Berlin he worked at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Rachel Carson Center and the Deutsches Museum in Munich, the University of Trento, and the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa.

Photo: Patsy Lynch/FEMA
Seaside Heights after Hurricane Sandy (New Jersey, Nov 2012)

School of Disobedience: Cryptoeconomics #1/3

Registration for the seminar is now closed.

A high-priesthood of financial elite holds the keys to the operating system of an economy showing signs of terminal dysfunctioning. In this context, commons-oriented network collectives, values and practices are gaining traction. Movements like free/open source software or p2p collaborative economy represent a cultural shift towards a more sustainable, egalitarian future. Can cryptoeconomics and blockchain technologies facilitate the transition from surveillance capitalism and data extractivism to common-based social architecture? This course will focus on critical and creative engagements with the building and scaling up of alternative visions and infrastructures. On the menu: data sovereignty, platform cooperativism, Universal Basic Income (or better, basic equity!); cosmo-financial practices and values to processually and ecologically integrate the externalities presiding to current capital formation; critical questioning of key cryptoeconomics concepts and their relation to the legacy of neoliberalism; etc. “They’re building something in there, something down there. Mutual debt, debt unpayable, debt unbounded, debt unconsolidated…” (The Undercommons).

Erik Bordeleau (PhD, Université de Montréal) is researcher at the SenseLab (Concordia University, Montreal) and fugitive financial designer at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA). He is also affiliated to the research group HAR (Histoire des arts et des representations - Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La défense) and co-founder of the collectives Entrepreneurs du commun and Econautic Consultancy. His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, media and financial theory, contemporary art and cinema studies, with a marked interest for the speculative turn and the renewal of the question of the possible in contemporary thinking.

School of Disobedience: Experimentations in Alternative Economies – CommonCoin, FairCoin, and Bank of the Commons

Erik Bordeleau in conversation with Emanuele Braga

Cryptoeconomics presents an important opportunity to re-think the way we conceive of value and account for social cooperation away from the extractive profit-taking hegemony. Since 2015, the MACAO community (Milan) has been developing a circular economy based on Commoncoin, paying all the labour, and providing to the members a monthly Basic Income in Euro. This initiative has been developed in collaboration with the Commonfare project and is closely related to the Faircoin network and the Bank of the Commons. These three projects represent a set of socio-political alternatives based on cooperation and mutual aid. Can we imagine a future in which decentralized cryptoeconomic and algorithmic infrastructures contribute to social life and avoid generating a democratic deficit as collateral effect?

Erik Bordeleau is a fugitive financial planner at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA) and researcher at the SenseLab (Montreal, Concordia University). His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, financial theory, contemporary art and media studies. He is currently working on the creation of an MA program in cryptoeconomics at the Global Center for Advanced Studies (GCAS) and enjoy, from time to time, the discreet charm of the precariat.

Emanuele Braga is an artist, researcher and activist. In addition to his work at MACAO, he co-founded the dance and theatre company Balletto Civile (2003), the contemporary art project Rhaze (2011), as well as Landscape Choreography (2012),an art platform questioning the role of the body under capitalism. His research focuses on models of cultural production, processes of social transformation, political economy, labor rights and the institution of the commons.

School of Disobedience: Cryptoeconomics #1/2

Registration for the seminar is now closed.

Participation in the seminar is free of charge via an open call. If you would like to participate please email a short paragraph about why you would like to join and a short narrative bio to schoolofdisobedience@gmail.com by January 25th. Places are limited and we will respond to you by January 31st.

A high-priesthood of financial elite holds the keys to the operating system of an economy showing signs of terminal dysfunctioning. In this context, commons-oriented network collectives, values and practices are gaining traction. Movements like free/open source software or p2p collaborative economy represent a cultural shift towards a more sustainable, egalitarian future. Can cryptoeconomics and blockchain technologies facilitate the transition from surveillance capitalism and data extractivism to common-based social architecture? This course will focus on critical and creative engagements with the building and scaling up of alternative visions and infrastructures. On the menu: data sovereignty, platform cooperativism, Universal Basic Income (or better, basic equity!); cosmo-financial practices and values to processually and ecologically integrate the externalities presiding to current capital formation; critical questioning of key cryptoeconomics concepts and their relation to the legacy of neoliberalism; etc. “They’re building something in there, something down there. Mutual debt, debt unpayable, debt unbounded, debt unconsolidated…” (The Undercommons).

Erik Bordeleau (PhD, Université de Montréal) is researcher at the SenseLab (Concordia University, Montreal) and fugitive financial designer at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA). He is also affiliated to the research group HAR (Histoire des arts et des representations - Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La défense) and co-founder of the collectives Entrepreneurs du commun and Econautic Consultancy. His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, media and financial theory, contemporary art and cinema studies, with a marked interest for the speculative turn and the renewal of the question of the possible in contemporary thinking.

School of Disobedience: Cryptoeconomics #1/1

Registration for the seminar is now closed.

A high-priesthood of financial elite holds the keys to the operating system of an economy showing signs of terminal dysfunctioning. In this context, commons-oriented network collectives, values and practices are gaining traction. Movements like free/open source software or p2p collaborative economy represent a cultural shift towards a more sustainable, egalitarian future. Can cryptoeconomics and blockchain technologies facilitate the transition from surveillance capitalism and data extractivism to common-based social architecture? This course will focus on critical and creative engagements with the building and scaling up of alternative visions and infrastructures. On the menu: data sovereignty, platform cooperativism, Universal Basic Income (or better, basic equity!); cosmo-financial practices and values to processually and ecologically integrate the externalities presiding to current capital formation; critical questioning of key cryptoeconomics concepts and their relation to the legacy of neoliberalism; etc. “They’re building something in there, something down there. Mutual debt, debt unpayable, debt unbounded, debt unconsolidated…” (The Undercommons).

Erik Bordeleau (PhD, Université de Montréal) is researcher at the SenseLab (Concordia University, Montreal) and fugitive financial designer at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA). He is also affiliated to the research group HAR (Histoire des arts et des representations - Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La défense) and co-founder of the collectives Entrepreneurs du commun and Econautic Consultancy. His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, media and financial theory, contemporary art and cinema studies, with a marked interest for the speculative turn and the renewal of the question of the possible in contemporary thinking.

School of Disobedience: Re-Thinking Value at the End of the Economy An Introduction to Cryptoeconomics

Doors open at 6 pm
Tickets: 5 / 3 €

Stemming from the incandescent core of the Occupy Wall Street movement, a question remains unanswered to this day: how to occupy a financial abstraction? Operating within this emergent blockchain space, Economic Space Agency (ECSA) conceives of crypto-finance as an expressive medium with the potential to exceed the restrictions and extractive procedures of the current market economy. With cryptoeconomics, it becomes possible to re-engineer and decolonize the money-form from within, and thus envisage p2p ecosystems of value that could escape, or at least redefine, the capitalist realm of generalized equivalence.

With Erik Bordeleau, from the Economic Space Agency

Erik Bordeleau, (PhD, Université de Montréal) is researcher at the SenseLab (Concordia University, Montreal) and fugitive financial designer at the Economic Space Agency (ECSA). He is also affiliated to the research group HAR (Histoire des arts et des representations - Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La défense) and co-founder of the collectives Entrepreneurs du commun and Econautic Consultancy. His work articulates at the intersection of political philosophy, media and financial theory, contemporary art and cinema studies, with a marked interest for the speculative turn and the renewal of the question of the possible in contemporary thinking.

Economic Space Agency brings together radical economists, software engineers, artists, theorists and crypto-technologists to take up a unique economic, ethical, aesthetical and political challenge: re-inventing finance as a collective practice of crafting futures and re-thinking value at the end of the economy as we know it.

School of Disobedience, Seminar #1/4

While democratic political institutions assume a fixed demos residing within state borders, unprecedented human movement and digital communications have rendered that assumption difficult to sustain. At the same time, “welcome culture” has come under attack, with renewed assertions of state sovereignty (from both right and left). This four-meeting workshop aims to foster new thinking on what an egalitarian politics of porous borders might look like today. Key to this possibility is not only extending humanitarian assistance to refugees, but establishing open political institutions that remain socially responsible. What forms of knowledge might help us with the challenging task? Through meetings with scholars and activists who have advanced cutting-edge thinking surrounding this subject, we will attempt to imagine new outlines for our transnational political communities. Four disciplinary perspectives will inform the discussion: digital communication, poetry, mental health, and law. Registered participants will be invited to lunch and will be provided with a packet of reading materials which will form the basis for discussion. An optional course assignment will include taking photos with your smart phone.

The seminar is open to everyone and free of charge. Nevertheless capacity is limited. In order to register please send an email with a short statement why you wish to participate to: itamar.mann@gmail.com

In cooperation with DeutschPlus and Die Offene Gesellschaft

[logo DoG 60]

Dr. Itamar Mann is a senior lecturer at the University of Haifa, Faculty of Law. His scholarship focuses on international law and political theory with an emphasis on the legal, political, and ethical questions refugees and migrants raise. Mann has published widely in leading journals and edited volumes, and his monograph, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law, came out with Cambridge University Press in 2016. Alongside his academic work, he is a legal adviser at GLAN (Global Legal Action Network), where he advances strategic litigation, focusing on migrant and refugee rights. Before moving to Haifa, Mann held a fellowship at Georgetown Law Center, Washington DC. His education includes an LLB from Tel Aviv University, and LLM and JSD degrees from Yale Law School.

Workshop plan:

October 8, 12-2pm: Digital Integrations
Guest: Safaa AbuJarour, Universität Potsdam

Ms. AbuJarour is a PhD researcher at the Universität Potsdam. In her current research topic on “The Role of Technology in Alleviating the Current Refugees’ Crisis”, she has been applying scientific research methods to the use of Social Networks by the refugees in Germany to increase their chances of getting integrated into the new society.

Reading:

For further reference:

October 15, 12-2pm: Placeless Poets
Guest: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of Birmingham

Prof. Stonebrige holds an interdisciplinary Chair in humanities and human rights at the University of Birmingham. Her work focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary literature and history, Human Rights, and Refugee Studies. She is also co-investigator at , a collaborative project with refugees and their host communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Her latest book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights and Refugees came out this year with Oxford University Press.

Reading:

  • Hannah Arendt, “We Refugees
  • Lyndsey Stonebridge, Placeless People (Oxford University Press, 2018) (excerpt, TBA)

October 22, 12-2pm: Trauma and Transnational Identity
Guest: Dr. Essam Daod, Humanity Crew

In 2015, Dr. Daod founded Humanity Crew with his wife Maria Jammal. With an operating base in Greece, Humanity Crew recruits, trains and deploys mental health professionals and qualified volunteers to deliver psychosocial services to refugees and displaced populations in an effort to improve refugee well-being and prevent further trauma. Alongside its operational work, Humanity Crew is dedicating to raising the profile of mental health care as a fundamental aspect of emergency humanitarian crisis response.

Reading:

October 29, 12-2pm: “We the Migrants”

Reading:

  • Gregory Feldman, We Are all Migrants: Political Action and the Ubiquitous Condition of Migrant-hood (Stanford University Press, 2015) (Introduction)
  • Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, The Cosmopolites (Columbia University Press, 2015) (Afterward)
  • Dr. Itamar Mann, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2016 (Chapter 6)
  • Richard Seymour, Reinventing the Anti-Immigrant Wheel, Patreon, September 3, 2018
School of Disobedience, Seminar #1/3

While democratic political institutions assume a fixed demos residing within state borders, unprecedented human movement and digital communications have rendered that assumption difficult to sustain. At the same time, “welcome culture” has come under attack, with renewed assertions of state sovereignty (from both right and left). This four-meeting workshop aims to foster new thinking on what an egalitarian politics of porous borders might look like today. Key to this possibility is not only extending humanitarian assistance to refugees, but establishing open political institutions that remain socially responsible. What forms of knowledge might help us with the challenging task? Through meetings with scholars and activists who have advanced cutting-edge thinking surrounding this subject, we will attempt to imagine new outlines for our transnational political communities. Four disciplinary perspectives will inform the discussion: digital communication, poetry, mental health, and law. Registered participants will be invited to lunch and will be provided with a packet of reading materials which will form the basis for discussion. An optional course assignment will include taking photos with your smart phone.

The seminar is open to everyone and free of charge. Nevertheless capacity is limited. In order to register please send an email with a short statement why you wish to participate to: itamar.mann@gmail.com

In cooperation with DeutschPlus and Die Offene Gesellschaft

[logo DoG 60]

Dr. Itamar Mann is a senior lecturer at the University of Haifa, Faculty of Law. His scholarship focuses on international law and political theory with an emphasis on the legal, political, and ethical questions refugees and migrants raise. Mann has published widely in leading journals and edited volumes, and his monograph, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law, came out with Cambridge University Press in 2016. Alongside his academic work, he is a legal adviser at GLAN (Global Legal Action Network), where he advances strategic litigation, focusing on migrant and refugee rights. Before moving to Haifa, Mann held a fellowship at Georgetown Law Center, Washington DC. His education includes an LLB from Tel Aviv University, and LLM and JSD degrees from Yale Law School.

Workshop plan:

October 8, 12-2pm: Digital Integrations
Guest: Safaa AbuJarour, Universität Potsdam

Ms. AbuJarour is a PhD researcher at the Universität Potsdam. In her current research topic on “The Role of Technology in Alleviating the Current Refugees’ Crisis”, she has been applying scientific research methods to the use of Social Networks by the refugees in Germany to increase their chances of getting integrated into the new society.

Reading:

For further reference:

October 15, 12-2pm: Placeless Poets
Guest: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of Birmingham

Prof. Stonebrige holds an interdisciplinary Chair in humanities and human rights at the University of Birmingham. Her work focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary literature and history, Human Rights, and Refugee Studies. She is also co-investigator at , a collaborative project with refugees and their host communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Her latest book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights and Refugees came out this year with Oxford University Press.

Reading:

  • Hannah Arendt, “We Refugees
  • Lyndsey Stonebridge, Placeless People (Oxford University Press, 2018) (excerpt, TBA)

October 22, 12-2pm: Trauma and Transnational Identity
Guest: Dr. Essam Daod, Humanity Crew

In 2015, Dr. Daod founded Humanity Crew with his wife Maria Jammal. With an operating base in Greece, Humanity Crew recruits, trains and deploys mental health professionals and qualified volunteers to deliver psychosocial services to refugees and displaced populations in an effort to improve refugee well-being and prevent further trauma. Alongside its operational work, Humanity Crew is dedicating to raising the profile of mental health care as a fundamental aspect of emergency humanitarian crisis response.

Reading:

October 28, 12-2pm: “We the Migrants”

Reading:

  • Gregory Feldman, We Are all Migrants: Political Action and the Ubiquitous Condition of Migrant-hood (Stanford University Press, 2015) (Introduction)
  • Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, The Cosmopolites (Columbia University Press, 2015) (Afterward)
  • Dr. Itamar Mann, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2016 (Chapter 6)
  • Richard Seymour, Reinventing the Anti-Immigrant Wheel, Patreon, September 3, 2018
School of Disobedience, Seminar #1/2

While democratic political institutions assume a fixed demos residing within state borders, unprecedented human movement and digital communications have rendered that assumption difficult to sustain. At the same time, “welcome culture” has come under attack, with renewed assertions of state sovereignty (from both right and left). This four-meeting workshop aims to foster new thinking on what an egalitarian politics of porous borders might look like today. Key to this possibility is not only extending humanitarian assistance to refugees, but establishing open political institutions that remain socially responsible. What forms of knowledge might help us with the challenging task? Through meetings with scholars and activists who have advanced cutting-edge thinking surrounding this subject, we will attempt to imagine new outlines for our transnational political communities. Four disciplinary perspectives will inform the discussion: digital communication, poetry, mental health, and law. Registered participants will be invited to lunch and will be provided with a packet of reading materials which will form the basis for discussion. An optional course assignment will include taking photos with your smart phone.

The seminar is open to everyone and free of charge. Nevertheless capacity is limited. In order to register please send an email with a short statement why you wish to participate to: itamar.mann@gmail.com

In cooperation with DeutschPlus and Die Offene Gesellschaft

[logo DoG 60]

Dr. Itamar Mann is a senior lecturer at the University of Haifa, Faculty of Law. His scholarship focuses on international law and political theory with an emphasis on the legal, political, and ethical questions refugees and migrants raise. Mann has published widely in leading journals and edited volumes, and his monograph, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law, came out with Cambridge University Press in 2016. Alongside his academic work, he is a legal adviser at GLAN (Global Legal Action Network), where he advances strategic litigation, focusing on migrant and refugee rights. Before moving to Haifa, Mann held a fellowship at Georgetown Law Center, Washington DC. His education includes an LLB from Tel Aviv University, and LLM and JSD degrees from Yale Law School.

Workshop plan:

October 8, 12-2pm: Digital Integrations
Guest: Safaa AbuJarour, Universität Potsdam

Ms. AbuJarour is a PhD researcher at the Universität Potsdam. In her current research topic on “The Role of Technology in Alleviating the Current Refugees’ Crisis”, she has been applying scientific research methods to the use of Social Networks by the refugees in Germany to increase their chances of getting integrated into the new society.

Reading:

For further reference:

October 15, 12-2pm: Placeless Poets
Guest: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of Birmingham

Prof. Stonebrige holds an interdisciplinary Chair in humanities and human rights at the University of Birmingham. Her work focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary literature and history, Human Rights, and Refugee Studies. She is also co-investigator at , a collaborative project with refugees and their host communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Her latest book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights and Refugees came out this year with Oxford University Press.

Reading:

  • Hannah Arendt, “We Refugees
  • Lyndsey Stonebridge, Placeless People (Oxford University Press, 2018) (excerpt, TBA)

October 22, 12-2pm: Trauma and Transnational Identity
Guest: Dr. Essam Daod, Humanity Crew

In 2015, Dr. Daod founded Humanity Crew with his wife Maria Jammal. With an operating base in Greece, Humanity Crew recruits, trains and deploys mental health professionals and qualified volunteers to deliver psychosocial services to refugees and displaced populations in an effort to improve refugee well-being and prevent further trauma. Alongside its operational work, Humanity Crew is dedicating to raising the profile of mental health care as a fundamental aspect of emergency humanitarian crisis response.

Reading:

October 28, 12-2pm: “We the Migrants”

Reading:

  • Gregory Feldman, We Are all Migrants: Political Action and the Ubiquitous Condition of Migrant-hood (Stanford University Press, 2015) (Introduction)
  • Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, The Cosmopolites (Columbia University Press, 2015) (Afterward)
  • Dr. Itamar Mann, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2016 (Chapter 6)
  • Richard Seymour, Reinventing the Anti-Immigrant Wheel, Patreon, September 3, 2018
School of Disobedience, Seminar #1/1

While democratic political institutions assume a fixed demos residing within state borders, unprecedented human movement and digital communications have rendered that assumption difficult to sustain. At the same time, “welcome culture” has come under attack, with renewed assertions of state sovereignty (from both right and left). This four-meeting workshop aims to foster new thinking on what an egalitarian politics of porous borders might look like today. Key to this possibility is not only extending humanitarian assistance to refugees, but establishing open political institutions that remain socially responsible. What forms of knowledge might help us with the challenging task? Through meetings with scholars and activists who have advanced cutting-edge thinking surrounding this subject, we will attempt to imagine new outlines for our transnational political communities. Four disciplinary perspectives will inform the discussion: digital communication, poetry, mental health, and law. Registered participants will be invited to lunch and will be provided with a packet of reading materials which will form the basis for discussion. An optional course assignment will include taking photos with your smart phone.

The seminar is open to everyone and free of charge. Nevertheless capacity is limited. In order to register please send an email with a short statement why you wish to participate to: itamar.mann@gmail.com

In cooperation with DeutschPlus and Die Offene Gesellschaft

[logo DoG 60]

Dr. Itamar Mann is a senior lecturer at the University of Haifa, Faculty of Law. His scholarship focuses on international law and political theory with an emphasis on the legal, political, and ethical questions refugees and migrants raise. Mann has published widely in leading journals and edited volumes, and his monograph, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law, came out with Cambridge University Press in 2016. Alongside his academic work, he is a legal adviser at GLAN (Global Legal Action Network), where he advances strategic litigation, focusing on migrant and refugee rights. Before moving to Haifa, Mann held a fellowship at Georgetown Law Center, Washington DC. His education includes an LLB from Tel Aviv University, and LLM and JSD degrees from Yale Law School.

Workshop plan:

October 8, 12-2pm: Digital Integrations
Guest: Safaa AbuJarour, Universität Potsdam

Ms. AbuJarour is a PhD researcher at the Universität Potsdam. In her current research topic on “The Role of Technology in Alleviating the Current Refugees’ Crisis”, she has been applying scientific research methods to the use of Social Networks by the refugees in Germany to increase their chances of getting integrated into the new society.

Reading:

For further reference:

October 15, 12-2pm: Placeless Poets
Guest: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of Birmingham

Prof. Stonebrige holds an interdisciplinary Chair in humanities and human rights at the University of Birmingham. Her work focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary literature and history, Human Rights, and Refugee Studies. She is also co-investigator at , a collaborative project with refugees and their host communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Her latest book, Placeless People: Writing, Rights and Refugees came out this year with Oxford University Press.

Reading:

  • Hannah Arendt, “We Refugees
  • Lyndsey Stonebridge, Placeless People (Oxford University Press, 2018) (excerpt, TBA)

October 22, 12-2pm: Trauma and Transnational Identity
Guest: Dr. Essam Daod, Humanity Crew

In 2015, Dr. Daod founded Humanity Crew with his wife Maria Jammal. With an operating base in Greece, Humanity Crew recruits, trains and deploys mental health professionals and qualified volunteers to deliver psychosocial services to refugees and displaced populations in an effort to improve refugee well-being and prevent further trauma. Alongside its operational work, Humanity Crew is dedicating to raising the profile of mental health care as a fundamental aspect of emergency humanitarian crisis response.

Reading:

October 28, 12-2pm: “We the Migrants”

Reading:

  • Gregory Feldman, We Are all Migrants: Political Action and the Ubiquitous Condition of Migrant-hood (Stanford University Press, 2015) (Introduction)
  • Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, The Cosmopolites (Columbia University Press, 2015) (Afterward)
  • Dr. Itamar Mann, Humanity at Sea: Maritime Migration and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2016 (Chapter 6)
  • Richard Seymour, Reinventing the Anti-Immigrant Wheel, Patreon, September 3, 2018
23.05
24.05
25.05
26.05
27.05
28.05
29.05
30.05
31.05
01.06
02.06
03.06
04.06
05.06
06.06
07.06
08.06
09.06
10.06
11.06
12.06
13.06
14.06
15.06
16.06
17.06
18.06
19.06
20.06
21.06
22.06
23.06
24.06
25.06
26.06
27.06
28.06
29.06
30.06
01.07
02.07
03.07
04.07
05.07
06.07
07.07
08.07
09.07
10.07
11.07
12.07
13.07
14.07
15.07
16.07
17.07
18.07
19.07
20.07
21.07
22.07
23.07
24.07
25.07
26.07
27.07
28.07
29.07
30.07
31.07
01.08
02.08
03.08
04.08
05.08
06.08
07.08
08.08
09.08
10.08
11.08
12.08
13.08
14.08
15.08
16.08
17.08
18.08
19.08
20.08
21.08
22.08
23.08
24.08
25.08
26.08
27.08
28.08
29.08
30.08
31.08
01.09
02.09
03.09
04.09
05.09
06.09
07.09
08.09
09.09
10.09
11.09
12.09
13.09
14.09
15.09
16.09
17.09
18.09
19.09
20.09
21.09
22.09
23.09
24.09
25.09
26.09
27.09
28.09
29.09
30.09
ʌ
v
This website uses cookies. You can read more about cookies in our disclaimer. > Morex